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virginia and look at those mountainsides -- go to west virginia and look at those mountainsides. what are we looking at engineers? we are looking at a combination of things. we are looking at electric, gas /electorate, natural gas and propane, but you are probably still looking at a majority market of fossil fuels. a more intelligent use of those fossil fuels, and gasoline and diesel engines, lighter weight materials and that sort of thing. there is no silver bullet out there. if you want a silver bullet and you want to scare people, then why not nuclear? why not? it works. in france, a lot of their electricity is nuclear power electricity and it works. why not put it in a car. never mind. [laughter] --let's go back to the days personal stuff, here. seventh grade, you started writing gov. jimmy davis, the singing governor, the so-called author of "you are my sunshine." what was it that moved you to write governor davis? >> the schools in the world for being integrated at that time. as punishment, the federal government said they would stop a black schoolteachers. >> why? >> i never ha
georgia, my father from southern virginia. they met in washington and married and had me. without the great migration, i would not be here. i have lived with all my life. i grew up with people from north carolina, south carolina, georgia, all around me. i was surrounded by the language, the food, the music, the ambitions of the people who migrated from the south. they argue about whose child would go to which school. it has been with me all this time. when it comes to the actual writing of a book, it probably writing of a book, it probably started after i got out and have been a reporter for "the new york times" talk to people. i was the chicago bureau chief for the "the new york times" i began to hear that there were similar migration experiences that people have. they talk about it as if they could not talk because they were going back to a family reunion in mississippi or a funeral. this is so much bigger than my experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experi
to virginia. they met and married there and had me. i was surrounded by the language, the food, the music, the ambitions of the people who had minus greated from the south. a lot of competition about whouz child would go to which school, catholic school, the school across the park. after i had gotten out and been a reporter for the times and talking to people around the country. i would go to chicago and cleveland and detroit and i would begin to hear there where similar migration experiences people had. they would talk to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where
and my father from southern virginia. and washington is where they met, married and then had me. so, without the great migration, i wouldn't be here. i don't know who you'd be talking to. so, i've lived with it all my life. i grew up with people from north carolina, south carolina, georgia -- all around me in the neighborhood where i grew up. and i was surrounded by the language, the food, the music, the ambitions, too, of the people who had migrated from the south. a lot of competition about who's child would go to which school, catholic school, the school across the park. so, it's been with me all this time. but i think that, when it comes to the actual writing of a book, it probably started, very likely, after i had gotten out and been a reporter for the "new york times" and started to talk to people in other parts of the country. i was chicago bureau chief for the "new york times." and i would go to chicago. i'd be in cleveland, i'd be in detroit. and i'd begin to hear that there were similar migration experiences that people had. no one talked about it as a migration experience
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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